projectunbreakable

projectunbreakable:

Hi everyone - as you may know, when we photograph, we always have participants sign release forms, which legally cover all forms of media. However, we wanted to gather a group of images from people who are 100% comfortable with them being used in media. If you have been photographed by Grace and are willing to volunteer your photo, please email us at projectunbreakable@gmail.com. Thanks!

(Sorry for posting so much today!)

npr
npr:

(via Whoosh: Pneumatic Tubes Give The Tooth Fairy A Boost)
Photo: Jeff Highsmith

When Jeff Highsmith would lose a tooth as a young boy, he would place it under his pillow, fall asleep and always wake up the next morning to a gift in its place. It was a pretty standard procedure, as far as the Tooth Fairy goes.
But with kids of his own who are starting to have wiggly teeth, he decided it was time to reinvent the tradition.
After all, does the Tooth Fairy even have time for personal pillow visits anymore? “It seemed prudent to figure out a way to send the teeth to her for processing, rather than make her visit the homes of all 7,103,000,000 people on Earth,” Highsmith wrote for Make Magazine.
So he built an intricate contraption that allowed his sons to send their teeth to the busy fairy — and, of course, receive a gift in exchange.

Highsmith made a pneumatic tooth transport:  He cut squares in the walls of his sons’ rooms, ran PVC pipes through the attic and attached a vacuum.  He even created an app that controls the system and helps his kids visualize the tooth collecting process.  — heidi

npr:

(via Whoosh: Pneumatic Tubes Give The Tooth Fairy A Boost)

Photo: Jeff Highsmith

When Jeff Highsmith would lose a tooth as a young boy, he would place it under his pillow, fall asleep and always wake up the next morning to a gift in its place. It was a pretty standard procedure, as far as the Tooth Fairy goes.

But with kids of his own who are starting to have wiggly teeth, he decided it was time to reinvent the tradition.

After all, does the Tooth Fairy even have time for personal pillow visits anymore? “It seemed prudent to figure out a way to send the teeth to her for processing, rather than make her visit the homes of all 7,103,000,000 people on Earth,” Highsmith wrote for Make Magazine.

So he built an intricate contraption that allowed his sons to send their teeth to the busy fairy — and, of course, receive a gift in exchange.

Highsmith made a pneumatic tooth transport:  He cut squares in the walls of his sons’ rooms, ran PVC pipes through the attic and attached a vacuum.  He even created an app that controls the system and helps his kids visualize the tooth collecting process.  — heidi